SpeedStand
Warning Line System
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Warning Line Safety
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F.A.Q.
(Frequently asked questions)
Q:
How do SpeedStands work?
A:
SpeedStands operate much like an umbrella. When a handle is pushed, legs quickly unfold and lock in an opened position. The opened stand supports a flagline. When the handle is pulled, the stand quickly collapses into a compact unit. Each stand is a one-piece assembly built ruggedly for the roofing environment.
Q:
How is a warning line system laid out?
A:
Setting up areas for loading, ladder access, hot pipes, and trash chutes is explained in the "How to Use Warning Line Systems Efficiently" article.
Q:
How is work in the area between the warning line and the edge performed?
A:
The warning line system protects workers from falling by preventing them from being near the edge of the roof. Assuming the roof deck has been sheathed and there are no uncovered holes, to work near the roof edge the warning line system is moved out of the way, and edge work is performed under the supervision of a safety monitor. The safety monitor directs the workers' safety and alerts them to danger. Mechanical equipment (such as felt layers) may not be used in this area near the edge. Where a worker must lean over an edge, as when using a rope and wheel, there must either be a guardrail or he must be tied to a qualified safety line system (fall arrest system).
Q:
How far apart should warning line stands be placed?
A:
About 40 feet. A set of 4 stands should give 160 feet of roof perimeter protection. Using a longer spacing puts excessive force on the stands, making them unstable and hard to use. Using a shorter spacing increases the number of stands and the handling labor to use them. The 40 foot guideline is a compromise between using as few stands as possible and making the system easy to work with. If the dimensions of a roof are such that a 45 foot spacing results in a cleaner setup, 45 feet will work well enough.
Q:
Are SpeedStands durable? Our crews are very hard one equipment.
A:
Our testing included throwing stands off of buildings and running them over with trucks, and while we don't recommend you use them that way, they will take a lot of rough treatment.
Q:
We've used other warning line stands, and have found them to be a lot of work. Our work crews hate them. How are these different?
A:
SpeedStands are lighter, quicker to set up, and easier to use. They're compact so that they're easy to haul, and leave room in your trucks for more equipment and materials. They're small enough to stack about 20 stands on a two-wheel cart which allows one man to set up a whole job while the rest of the crew does meaningful work. They also feature a unique tilted post which angles toward the work area so that when the warning line system is set up, the stands are out of the way of the work area.
Q:
Can warning line systems be used on any slope roof?
A:
Warning line systems are acceptable fall protection on roofs with slopes up to 4:12. On wet, slippery roofs with slopes near 4:12, secure the stands when there is a possibility of the stands sliding.
Q:
Will the stands work in high winds?
A:
Yes, but in windy weather a warning line system must be weighted down to secure it, the same as other roofing equipment and materials. Stands can be secured by laying dead weight on their bases. At the end of the workday, the stands can be collapsed and left in place for quick set up the next day.
Q:
Do I need a guardrail at a hot pipe?
A:
Setting up to pump 6 feet past an edge usually requires the pipe to be at about a 45 angle. On moderate height buildings the kettle can be positioned away from the building for a 45 angle. On higher buildings, angled pipe fittings can be used.
Q:
Can SpeedStand for Metal Roofs be used on flat roofs?
A:
Several of our customers use them for all kinds of flat roofs including single plies and built-up roofing. Metal roof stands have leg pads that you should clean before you use them on a metal deck to keep any asphalt or glue residue from marking the metal finish. When the metal roof stands are knocked down, the pads stick out, so they are not as compact as the standard stands. The metal roof stands also cost bit more.
Q:
What's involved with fall protection?
A:
Fall protection equipment is costly and using it tends to restrict workers and reduce productivity. On the positive side, workers adapt to working safely and integrate fall protection into their routines. They begin to accept a safety mentality and have fewer accidents, which not only lowers insurance rates, and but protects a company's investment in its workers.
In areas where there is little enforcement of the fall protection laws, some companies have been able to work for years without complying. In these areas where noncompliance is widespread, a contractor who includes fall protection in his bids may be at a disadvantage.
Contractors who are caught not using fall protection are often fined in the neighborhood of $2500 for their first offense and can expect further inspections. One can expect enforcement on upscale, high profile jobs. Many large companies pursue safety aggressively and specialize in both upscale and high profile projects.
Q:
Are there any other fall protection codes?
A:
Yes. All the requirements we have stated are for U.S. Federal codes for low slope roofing. Holes, skylights, and other dangers have additional rules. There are requirements for other work such as leading edge brickwork. Steel erection has special codes referred to in our article WARNING LINE SYSTEMS FOR METAL ROOFS. California and Washington State have laws that differ from the federal laws.
In California, warning lines may hang as high as 45" and as low as 34". This allows taller stands spaced 50 feet apart and leads to reduced costs. When a company is working on a federal project in California with federal inspectors, standard height stands (39 3/8") are used.
In Washington State, warning lines may hang as high as 45" and as low as 36", although some variations in height are presently allowed.
Local requirements may also differ.
In Canada, the safety laws vary in each province.
Q:
How do you ship?
A:
We ship with UPS and several trucking companies to give the best shipping rates possible. Shipping rates depend on weight and your zip code. In general, as shipping weight increases, the cost per pound decreases.
Q:
Can you ship overnight?
A:
We can ship overnight for orders received by 2 p.m. PST. Because overnight shipping is often expensive, it's often wiser to ask us to refer you to the nearest distributor.
If you have any other product or safety questions not addressed here please                
Manufacturers of Roofing Equipment
A warning line system uses a flagline to surround a work area on a roof to keep workers away from the edges. Stands are laid out to support the warning line. The line can be no closer than 6 feet from any edge. Where mechanical equipment (such as a felt layer) is used toward an edge, the line must be at least 10 feet from that edge, giving an extra measure of safety. The line can be no higher than 39 3/8" (1 meter) and can be no lower than 34" at its lowest point. This is the basic setup.
Yes. The stands are made of welded steel and are designed for abuse. The post tubing is a thick gage steel (.083"). Leg channel is 1/8" thick, and the braces are solid steel bar. The legs pivot on reinforced joints with special high tensile strength pins and the triangular-shaped design is extremely strong.
When hot asphalt is pumped to an edge, an 8 foot long guardrail is required to protect the workers. If it is pumped to a point 6 feet in from the edge and past the warning line, no guardrail is necessary.
Companies that haven't used fall protection face substantial changes to comply with the law. Fall protection laws were made to prevent deaths and injuries from falls. The Federal laws are found in 29 CFR 1926.500-.503. Our article on OSHA requirements includes material from a helpful government pamphlet. Fall protection on flat roofs can be provided with proper guardrails, safety lines, safety nets, warning lines, or safety monitors under various conditions. the most practical system to use depends on the each job. Warning line systems have been the most common systems in use because of their low cost and flexibility, but can not be used in all situations.
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